Your children are not your children.
They are the sons and daughters of life’s longing for itself.
They come through you but not from you.
And though they are with you yet they belong not to you.
You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
For they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies but not their souls.
For their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow,
Which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them, but seek not to make them like you.
For life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday.
You are the bows from your children as living arrows are sent forth
The archer sees the mark upon the path of the infinite,
And he bends you with his might that his arrows may go swift and far.
For your bending in the archer’s hand be for gladness;
For even he loves the arrow that flies, so loves also the bow that is stable.

Kahlil Gibran

Hello, friends.

I am a tiny bit overwhelmed by life, the universe and everything at the moment, so just something short today. There’s a weekly project on I Heart Snapping blog called Living Arrows, all about photos that capture a moment in the life of a child. The title comes from the passage by Kahlil Gibran above. I love the thought that our children are part of us but separate too: that we’ll send them forward into days we’ll never see, that all we can do is steady their forward leap, and watch their paths with our mouths open.

Today the boys had simultaneous nappy explosions after their afternoon naps. I don’t know what they’ve eaten, but in Teddy’s case I’m willing to bet it came from the floor. I showered them both off and plopped them down into sunshine on Henry’s bed.

Sometimes, and that minute was one of them, they are just delighted with themselves and each other, with the twosomeness of the two of them. Henry pulls out his repertoire of faces; Teddy laughs; Henry laughs harder. I can see down the years like a tunnel, and imagine them gangly-limbed and cracking each other up at my expense, light on their faces, potty training miles behind them and bigger, brighter, more sanitary milestones ahead.

SAM_5459

living arrows

Post Author: timothyjeffcoat

3 Replies to “Living arrows: how we laugh”

  1. It was so nice to see them today! I do wish I could have stayed longer, but at last I got a good chance to see the towering packet of small child that is nearly-three-year-old Henry.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Archives

instagrams

  • Small medium large PS Thank you so much for thehellip
  • Iwrote something! Its been so long that I almost chickenedhellip
  • For DressAsYourFavouriteBookCharacter day I told them they had to choosehellip
  • On Sunday we attempted to take a Christmas photo Fourhellip
  • Give me a meal you eat partly with your fingershellip
  • He requested a toffee cake and Krispy Kreme waffles forhellip
  • I have to tell you when we thought about havinghellip
  • SOME NOTES SO FAR FROM EXERCISING EVERY DAY  youhellip
  • Every day I get back into the car after takinghellip
%d bloggers like this: